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Missouri Who Regulates Dog Kennels?

Missouri Who Regulates Dog Kennels
Missouri’s Animal Care Facility Program regulates breeders, dealers, boarders, shelters and pet stores to ensure that they meet state standards regarding feed, water, shelter, veterinary care, building maintenance, socialization, identification and recordkeeping requirements.

What is the Animal Care Facilities Act in Missouri?

The purpose of this act is to prohibit the cruel and inhumane treatment of dogs bred in large operations by requiring large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with basic food and water, adequate shelter from the elements, necessary veterinary care, adequate space to turn around and

Do you need a license to board dogs in Missouri?

Summary: Under these Missouri statutes, a license is required to operate animal boarding facilities, pet shops, pounds, dealers and commercial breeders. The canine cruelty prevention act makes it the crime of canine cruelty if the person poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of animals in the person’s custody.

  1. A violation is a misdemeanor.273.325,
  2. Citation of law-definitions 273.327,
  3. License annually required to operate animal boarding facilities, pet shops, pounds, dealers and commercial breeders-fees, exemption from fees for certain licensees 273.329,
  4. Director may refuse to license or may revoke licenses, grounds-operation without license, penalty 273.331,

Inspection required for license-state veterinarian’s duties and authority-provisional license issued until inspection-inspections required annually or on complaint.273.333, Investigations conducted, when-violations, administrative procedure-order for remedial action by circuit courts-administrative penalties, amount-penalties, deposit in general revenue-appeals, procedure 273.335,

  • Substantial ongoing risk to health and welfare of animals, temporary or permanent injunction-animals in pain or diseased taken into custody for euthanasia, when, costs to licensee 273.338,
  • Failure of reinspections after original violation, penalty, amount-payment of penalty required before license renewal 273.340,

Dealers to purchase only from licensed or exempt persons-violation, penalties 273.342, Exemption from licensing requirements, certain persons-registration required annually, content, no fee 273.344, Standards and regulations for licensed persons and facilities-director to promulgate rules 273.345,

  1. Canine cruelty prevention act-citation of law-purpose-required care-definitions-veterinary records-space requirements-severability clause 273.346,
  2. Director to develop rules for health and veterinary care for animals in custody and facilities of licensees-records to be kept-pounds, major construction not to be required 273.347,

Court action for enforcement, when-crime of canine cruelty, penalty 273.348, Facilities to be open for inspection-quarantine of animals, by state veterinarian, when-quarantine removed, when-removal of animals under quarantine prohibited-disease treatment procedures, duties of state veterinarian-violations, penalty 273.350,

  1. Director to develop rules to include safety standards for motor vehicles transporting live animals-define exotic animals and their care-wildlife not to be included-shipping diseased animals, penalty 273.352,
  2. Advisory committee, appointment, qualifications-duties to assist in establishing rules-not to receive compensation or expenses-rulemaking procedure 273.354,

Laws not applicable to hospitals or boarding facility under supervision of veterinarians or research 273.357, Animal care reserve fund created-all license fees to be deposited in fund-purpose and uses-lapse to general revenue, prohibited 273.359, Stacked cages without impervious barrier prohibited, penalty 273.325.

Citation of law-definitions 1. Sections 273.325 to 273.357 shall be known as the “Animal Care Facilities Act”.2. As used in sections 273.325 to 273.357, the following terms mean: (1) “Adequate food”, the provision, at suitable intervals of not more than twelve hours, unless the dietary requirements of the species require a longer interval, of a quantity of wholesome foodstuff, suitable for the species and age, sufficient to maintain a reasonable level of nutrition in each animal, all of which foodstuff is served in a safe receptacle, dish, or container; (2) “Adequate housing”, the continuous provision of a sanitary facility, protection from the extremes of weather conditions, proper ventilation, and appropriate space depending on the species of animal, as defined by regulations of the USDA, as revised; (3) “Adequate water”, the provision, either continuously or at intervals suitable to the species, which intervals shall not exceed eight hours, of a supply of potable water in a safe receptacle, dish, or container; (4) “Animal”, any dog or cat, which is being used, or is intended for use, for research, teaching, testing, breeding, or exhibition purposes, or as a pet; (5) “Animal shelter”, a facility which is used to house or contain animals, which is owned, operated, or maintained by an incorporated humane society, animal welfare society, society for the prevention of cruelty to animals, or other not-for-profit organization devoted to the welfare, protection, and humane treatment of such animals, or a person whose primary purpose is to act as an animal rescue, to collect and care for unwanted animals or to offer them for adoption; (6) “Animal welfare official”, any licensed veterinarian, designated by and under the supervision of the state veterinarian, who administers or assists in the administration of the provisions of sections 273.325 to 273.357, or any appointee of the director, and shall include all deputy state veterinarians; (7) “Boarding kennel”, a place or establishment, other than a pound or animal shelter, where animals, not owned by the proprietor, are sheltered, fed, and watered in return for a consideration; however, “boarding kennel” shall not include hobby or show breeders who board intact females for a period of time for the sole purpose of breeding such intact females, and shall not include individuals who temporarily, and not in the normal course of business, board or care for animals owned by other individuals; (8) “Commercial breeder”, a person, other than a hobby or show breeder, engaged in the business of breeding animals for sale or for exchange in return for a consideration, and who harbors more than three intact females for the primary purpose of breeding animals for sale; (9) “Commercial kennel”, a kennel which performs grooming or training services for animals, and may or may not render boarding services in return for a consideration; (10) “Contract kennel”, any facility operated by any person or entity other than the state or any political subdivision of the state, for the purpose of impounding or harboring seized, stray, homeless, abandoned or unwanted animals, on behalf of and pursuant to a contract with the state or any political subdivision; (11) “Dealer”, any person who is engaged in the business of buying for resale, selling or exchanging animals, as a principal or agent, or who holds himself out to be so engaged or is otherwise classified as a dealer by the USDA as defined by regulations of the USDA; (12) “Director”, the director of the department of agriculture of the state of Missouri; (13) “Hobby or show breeder”, a noncommercial breeder who breeds dogs or cats with the primary purpose of exhibiting or showing dogs or cats, improving the breed or selling the dogs or cats, and having no more than ten intact females.

Such breeder shall be classified as a hobby or show breeder if such person only sells animals to other breeders or to individuals; (14) “Humane euthanasia”, the act or practice of putting an animal to death in a humane or instantaneous manner under guidelines and procedures established by rules promulgated by the director; (15) “Intact female”, with respect to a dog, refers to a female dog between the ages of six months and ten years of age which is capable of being bred; and with respect to a cat, refers to a female cat between the ages of six months and eight years which is capable of being bred; (16) “Pet shop”, any facility where animals are bought, sold, exchanged, or offered for retail sale to the general public; (17) “Pound” or “dog pound”, a facility operated by the state or any political subdivision of the state for the purpose of impounding or harboring seized, stray, homeless, abandoned, or unwanted animals; (18) “State veterinarian”, the state veterinarian as provided by chapter 267, RSMo; (19) “USDA”, the United States Department of Agriculture.

CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636 § 1.) 273.327. License annually required to operate animal boarding facilities, pet shops, pounds, dealers and commercial breeders-fees, exemption from fees for certain licensees No person shall operate an animal shelter, pound or dog pound, boarding kennel, commercial kennel, contract kennel, pet shop, or exhibition facility, other than a limited show or exhibit, or act as a dealer or commercial breeder, unless such person has obtained a license for such operations from the director.

An applicant shall obtain a separate license for each separate physical facility subject to sections 273.325 to 273.357 which is operated by the applicant. Any person exempt from the licensing requirements of sections 273.325 to 273.357 may voluntarily apply for a license.

  • Application for such license shall be made in the manner provided by the director.
  • The license shall expire annually unless revoked.
  • As provided by rules to be promulgated by the director, the license fee shall range from one hundred to two thousand five hundred dollars per year.
  • Each licensee subject to sections 273.325 to 273.357 shall pay an additional annual fee of twenty-five dollars to be used by the department of agriculture for the purpose of administering Operation Bark Alert or any successor program.

Pounds or dog pounds shall be exempt from payment of the fees under this section. License fees shall be levied for each license issued or renewed on or after January 1, 1993. Credits (L.1992 S.B. No.636 § 2, subsec.1. Amended by L.2010, S.B. No.795, § A; L.2011, S.B.

  1. Nos.113 & 95, § A; L.2011, S.B.
  2. No.161, § A, eff.
  3. April 27, 2011.) 273.329.
  4. Director may refuse to license or may revoke licenses, grounds-operation without license, penalty 1.
  5. The director may refuse to issue or renew or may revoke a license on any one or more of the following grounds: (1) Material and deliberate misstatement in the application for any original license or for any renewal license under sections 273.325 to 273.357; (2) Disregard or violation of sections 273.325 to 273.357 or of any rules promulgated pursuant thereto; (3) Conviction of any violation of any state or federal law relating to the disposition or treatment of animals; (4) Failure to provide adequate food, water, housing or sanitary facilities for animals under the control of an animal shelter, boarding kennel, commercial breeder, commercial kennel, contract kennel, dealer, pet shop, pound, or exhibitor as defined by regulations of the USDA.2.

The department of agriculture shall not retain, contract with, or otherwise utilize the services of the personnel of any nonprofit organization for the purpose of inspection or licensing of any animal shelter, pound or dog pound, boarding kennel, commercial kennel, contract kennel, commercial breeder, hobby or show breeder, or pet shop under sections 273.325 to 273.357.3.

  1. Operation of an animal shelter, pound or dog pound, boarding kennel, commercial kennel, contract kennel, pet shop, or exhibition facility, or activity as a commercial breeder or dealer without a valid license shall constitute a class A misdemeanor.
  2. CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B.
  3. No.636, § 2, subsecs.2, 3.
  4. Amended by L.2010, S.B.

No.795, § A.) 273.331. Inspection required for license-state veterinarian’s duties and authority-provisional license issued until inspection-inspections required annually or on complaint. A license shall be issued only upon inspection by the state veterinarian, his designee, or an animal welfare official.

A facility subject to the provisions of sections 273.325 to 273.357, at the time it applies for licensure, shall be granted a provisional license which shall allow operation of the facility until the facility is inspected or until December 31, 1994, whichever earlier occurs. The state veterinarian shall have the duty and authority to inspect all facilities licensed under sections 273.325 to 273.357.

Inspections shall be conducted a minimum of once a year, or upon a complaint to the department regarding a particular facility. The validity of the complaint will be ascertained by the state veterinarian or his designated representative. CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B.

  1. No.636 § 2, subsec.4.) 273.333.
  2. Investigations conducted, when-violations, administrative procedure-order for remedial action by circuit courts-administrative penalties, amount-penalties, deposit in general revenue-appeals, procedure The state veterinarian or an animal welfare official, upon his own information or upon the complaint of any person, may institute an investigation including the inspection during normal business hours of any premises or vehicle upon which any animal is or may be found, and may determine if any violation of sections 273.325 to 273.357 or of any rule promulgated pursuant to sections 273.325 to 273.357 is deemed to exist.

The director, or his designee, may issue an order to the person responsible for the violation to appear at an administrative hearing. The director, or his designee, upon a finding that such a violation occurred after a hearing thereon, shall issue remedial orders enforceable in the circuit courts of this state to correct such violations, and in addition may assess an administrative penalty in an amount not to exceed one thousand dollars for each violation.

  1. In assessing the amount of penalty under sections 273.327 to 273.342, the director shall take into account the seriousness of the violation and the extent of damage to third parties and the state.
  2. All penalties collected shall be deposited to the state general revenue fund.
  3. In addition, the director may assess the reasonable costs of remedying a violation in the event that the person responsible is unwilling or unable to correct the violation within a reasonable period of time.

Any person aggrieved by the decision of the director may appeal as provided in sections 536.100 to 536.140, RSMo. CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 2, subsec.5.) 273.335. Substantial ongoing risk to health and welfare of animals, temporary or permanent injunction-animals in pain or diseased taken into custody for euthanasia, when, costs to licensee When, in the judgment of the state veterinarian or an animal welfare official, any person has been in violation of sections 273.325 to 273.357 so as to pose a substantial ongoing risk to the health and welfare of animals in his custody or so as to pose a substantial ongoing risk that consumers will purchase diseased animals from such person, the director may apply to the circuit court of the county in which such person resides, and such court may grant an order enjoining temporarily or permanently that person from engaging in activities described in section 273.327.

  1. If the animals being held in any of the facilities licensed under sections 273.325 to 273.357 are found to be suffering unrelieved pain or distress or disease, the animals may be taken into custody for humane euthanasia at the expense of the licensee.
  2. Reasonable effort shall be made to notify the facility operator of such intent and only upon his refusal or inability to immediately correct the causative violation and provide adequate veterinary care shall such action be taken.

Nothing in sections 273.325 to 273.357 shall be construed to interfere with scientific research as enunciated in subsection 2 of section 273.354. CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 2, subsec.6.) 273.338. Failure of reinspections after original violation, penalty, amount-payment of penalty required before license renewal Persons and facilities which subsequently fail two consecutive reinspections for an original violation shall be charged a fee of one hundred dollars, which shall be paid before subsequent inspection and renewal of such person’s or facility’s license.

CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 2, subsec.7.) 273.340. Dealers to purchase only from licensed or exempt persons-violation, penalties A dealer shall only purchase animals from persons in this state who are licensed under sections 273.325 to 273.357, or who are exempt from licensure. Any dealer who knowingly purchases animals in violation of this section shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor and each purchase made shall constitute a separate offense.

In addition to such penalties, the director may revoke such dealer’s license. CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 2, subsec.8.) 273.342. Exemption from licensing requirements, certain persons-registration required annually, content, no fee 1. Persons engaged in breeding dogs and cats who harbor three or less intact females shall be exempt from the provisions of sections 273.325 to 273.357.2.

A hobby or show breeder shall be exempt from the licensure and inspection requirements of sections 273.325 to 273.357. The director shall develop a form for registration of persons who meet the definition of hobby or show breeder, and any such hobby or show breeder shall register annually with the director for the purpose of establishing that such person is a hobby or show breeder, at no cost to said hobby or show breeder.

CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 2, subsecs.9, 10.) 273.344. Standards and regulations for licensed persons and facilities-director to promulgate rules 1. Persons and facilities subject to USDA licensure shall comply with the standards and regulations as prescribed by the USDA, as revised from time to time.2.

Persons and facilities who are subject to sections 273.325 to 273.357, but who are not subject to USDA licensure, shall comply with rules promulgated by the director which establish standards relating to the following: (1) Adequate shelter, including proper conditions of sanitation and ventilation; (2) Adequate food and water; and (3) Maintenance of records of acquisition and disposition of animals in the custody of the licensee.

CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 3, subsecs.1, 2.) 273.345. Canine cruelty prevention act-citation of law-purpose-required care-definitions-veterinary records-space requirements-severability clause 1. This section shall be known and may be cited as the “Canine Cruelty Prevention Act”.2.

The purpose of this act is to prohibit the cruel and inhumane treatment of dogs bred in large operations by requiring large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with basic food and water, adequate shelter from the elements, necessary veterinary care, adequate space to turn around and stretch his or her limbs, and regular exercise.3.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any person having custody or ownership of more than ten female covered dogs for the purpose of breeding those animals and selling any offspring for use as a pet shall provide each covered dog: (1) Sufficient food and clean water; (2) Necessary veterinary care; (3) Sufficient housing, including protection from the elements; (4) Sufficient space to turn and stretch freely, lie down, and fully extend his or her limbs; (5) Regular exercise; and (6) Adequate rest between breeding cycles.4.

For purposes of this section and notwithstanding the provisions of section 273.325, the following terms have the following meanings: (1) “Adequate rest between breeding cycles” means, at minimum, ensuring that female dogs are not bred to produce more litters in any given period than what is recommended by a licensed veterinarian as appropriate for the species, age, and health of the dog; (2) “Covered dog” means any individual of the species of the domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, or resultant hybrids, that is over the age of six months and has intact sexual organs; (3) “Necessary veterinary care” means, at minimum, examination at least once yearly by a licensed veterinarian, prompt treatment of any serious illness or injury by a licensed veterinarian, and where needed, humane euthanasia by a licensed veterinarian using lawful techniques deemed acceptable by the American Veterinary Medical Association; (4) “Person” means any individual, firm, partnership, joint venture, association, limited liability company, corporation, estate, trust, receiver, or syndicate; (5) “Pet” means any species of the domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, or resultant hybrids, normally maintained in or near the household of the owner thereof; (6) “Regular exercise” means the type and amount of exercise sufficient to comply with an exercise plan that has been approved by a licensed veterinarian, developed in accordance with regulations regarding exercise promulgated by the Missouri department of agriculture, and where such plan affords the dog maximum opportunity for outdoor exercise as weather permits; (7) “Retail pet store” means a person or retail establishment open to the public where dogs are bought, sold, exchanged, or offered for retail sale directly to the public to be kept as pets, but that does not engage in any breeding of dogs for the purpose of selling any offspring for use as a pet; (8) “Sufficient food and clean water” means access to appropriate nutritious food at least twice a day sufficient to maintain good health, and continuous access to potable water that is not frozen and is generally free of debris, feces, algae, and other contaminants; (9) “Sufficient housing, including protection from the elements” means the continuous provision of a sanitary facility, the provision of a solid surface on which to lie in a recumbent position, protection from the extremes of weather conditions, proper ventilation, and appropriate space depending on the species of animal as required by regulations of the Missouri department of agriculture and in compliance with the provisions of subsection 7 of this section.

No dog shall remain inside its enclosure while the enclosure is being cleaned. Dogs housed within the same enclosure shall be compatible, in accordance with regulations promulgated by the Missouri department of agriculture; (10) “Sufficient space to turn and stretch freely, lie down, and fully extend his or her limbs” means having: (a) Sufficient indoor space or shelter from the elements for each dog to turn in a complete circle without any impediment (including a tether); (b) Enough indoor space or shelter from the elements for each dog to lie down and fully extend his or her limbs and stretch freely without touching the side of an enclosure or another dog; (c) Appropriate space depending on the species of the animal, as specified in regulations by the Missouri department of agriculture, as revised, and in compliance with the provisions of subsection 7 of this section.5.

  • Any person subject to the provisions of this section shall maintain all veterinary records and sales records for the most recent previous two years.
  • These records shall be made available to the state veterinarian, a state or local animal welfare official, or a law enforcement agent upon request.6.
  • The provisions of this section are in addition to, and not in lieu of, any other state and federal laws protecting animal welfare.
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This section shall not be construed to limit any state law or regulation protecting the welfare of animals, nor shall anything in this section prevent a local governing body from adopting and enforcing its own animal welfare laws and regulations in addition to this section.

This section shall not be construed to place any numerical limits on the number of dogs a person may own or control when such dogs are not used for breeding those animals and selling any offspring for use as a pet. This section shall not apply to a dog during examination, testing, operation, recuperation, or other individual treatment for veterinary purposes, during lawful scientific research, during transportation, during cleaning of a dog’s enclosure, during supervised outdoor exercise, or during any emergency that places a dog’s life in imminent danger.

Nothing in this section shall be construed to limit hunting or the ability to breed, raise, sell, control, train, or possess dogs with the intention to use such dogs for hunting or other sporting purposes.7. Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the following space requirements shall apply under this section: (1) From January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2015, for any enclosure existing prior to April 15, 2011, the minimum allowable space shall: (a) Be two times the space allowable under the department of agriculture’s regulation that was in effect on April 15, 2011; (b) Except as prescribed by rule, provide constant and unfettered access to an attached outdoor run; and (c) Meet all other requirements set forth by rule of the Missouri department of agriculture; (2) For any enclosure newly constructed after April 15, 2011, and for all enclosures as of January 1, 2016, the minimum allowable space shall: (a) Be three times the space allowable under the department of agriculture’s regulation that was in effect on April 15, 2011; (b) Except as prescribed by rule, provide constant and unfettered access to an attached outdoor run; and (c) Meet all other requirements set forth by rule of the Missouri department of agriculture; (3) For any enclosure newly constructed after April 15, 2011, and for all enclosures as of January 1, 2016, wire strand flooring shall be prohibited and all enclosures shall meet the flooring standard set forth by rule of the Missouri department of agriculture.8.

If any provision of this section, or the application thereof to any person or circumstances, is held invalid or unconstitutional, that invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect other provisions or applications of this section that can be given effect without the invalid or unconstitutional provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this section are severable.

Credits (Adopted by Initiative Petition, Proposition B, 2010-085, at general election Nov.2, 2010. Amended by L.2011, S.B. Nos.113 & 95, § A; L.2011, S.B. No.161, § A, eff. April 27, 2011.) 273.346. Director to develop rules for health and veterinary care for animals in custody and facilities of licensees-records to be kept-pounds, major construction not to be required 1.

  1. The director shall promulgate rules for an adequate program of health and veterinary care which shall be maintained for all animals in the custody of persons and facilities subject to licensure pursuant to sections 273.325 to 273.357, except pounds or dog pounds.
  2. Records of veterinary services provided to such animals shall be maintained and made available to the state veterinarian or an animal welfare official upon request.2.

Any such rules promulgated to cover pounds or dog pounds shall not require or be applied so as to require the construction of any new buildings or major reconstruction of any physical plant beyond the scope of normal upkeep and repair. CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B.

  • No.636, § 3, subsecs.3, 4.) 273.347.
  • Court action for enforcement, when-crime of canine cruelty, penalty 1.
  • Whenever the state veterinarian or a state animal welfare official finds past violations of sections 273.325 to 273.357 have occurred and have not been corrected or addressed, including operating without a valid license under section 273.327, the director may request the attorney general or the county prosecuting attorney or circuit attorney to bring an action in circuit court in the county where the violations have occurred for a temporary restraining order, preliminary injunction, permanent injunction, or a remedial order enforceable in a circuit court to correct such violations and, in addition, the court may assess a civil penalty in an amount not to exceed one thousand dollars for each violation.

Each violation shall constitute a separate offense.2. A person commits the crime of canine cruelty if such person repeatedly violates sections 273.325 to 273.357 so as to pose a substantial risk to the health and welfare of animals in such person’s custody, or knowingly violates an agreed-to remedial order involving the safety and welfare of animals under this section.

The crime of canine cruelty is a class C misdemeanor, unless the person has previously pled guilty or nolo contendere to or been found guilty of a violation of this subsection, in which case, each such violation is a class A misdemeanor.3. The attorney general or the county prosecuting attorney or circuit attorney may bring an action under sections 273.325 to 273.357 in circuit court in the county where the crime has occurred for criminal punishment.4.

No action under this section shall prevent or preclude action taken under section 578.012 or under subsection 3 of section 273.329. Credits (L.2011, S.B. Nos.113 & 95, § A; L.2011, S.B. No.161, § A, eff. April 27, 2011.) 273.348. Facilities to be open for inspection-quarantine of animals, by state veterinarian, when-quarantine removed, when-removal of animals under quarantine prohibited-disease treatment procedures, duties of state veterinarian-violations, penalty 1.

  1. The premises of each licensee shall be open for inspection.2.
  2. If, upon investigation, the state veterinarian or an animal welfare official finds that an animal or group of animals is suffering from any highly contagious, communicable or infectious disease or exposure thereto, against which he may think best to quarantine, he shall immediately quarantine the animal or group of animals to the premises and separate from other susceptible animals not so diseased or infected until such diseased animals are: (1) Recovered and no longer capable of transmitting the diseases; (2) Isolated; (3) Humanely euthanized and disposed of as provided for in the rules of the director; (4) Tested, vaccinated or otherwise treated; or (5) Otherwise released by the state veterinarian.

Animals under quarantine and treatment or testing may not be removed from the premises until the licensee is notified that such animals are recovered and incapable of spreading the disease and otherwise released by the state veterinarian or an animal welfare official.

  • The method of eliminating the disease problem shall be at the discretion and in accordance with such procedures as may be outlined by the state veterinarian.3.
  • Violation of the provisions of sections 273.344 to 273.348 shall be a class A misdemeanor.
  • CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B.
  • No.636, § 3, subsecs.5, 6, 7.) 273.350.

Director to develop rules to include safety standards for motor vehicles transporting live animals-define exotic animals and their care-wildlife not to be included-shipping diseased animals, penalty The director shall promulgate rules pursuant to the provisions of chapter 536, RSMo, required to implement the provisions of sections 273.325 to 273.357.

  • Such rules shall include establishing health and safety standards for motor vehicles regularly used in the commercial transportation of live animals.
  • The director shall also by rule define the term “exotic animals”, which shall generally refer to canines and felines not ordinarily kept for domestic purposes, and shall promulgate rules establishing standards for food, water, housing and health care for exotic animals and standards for determining whether a particular operation is a farming practice or is a breeder of pets; provided that the authority of the department of conservation to regulate wildlife within the state of Missouri as provided by section 252.030, RSMo, shall not be deprived or diminished.

Any animal welfare official shall have the authority of an animal control officer as defined by chapter 578, RSMo. It shall be unlawful for any person licensed or registered pursuant to sections 273.325 to 273.357 to knowingly ship a diseased animal, and any such person who violates this provision shall be subject to a fine of not more than one hundred dollars for each diseased animal shipped.

Sections 273.325 to 273.357 and the rules promulgated thereunder shall apply to all businesses, individuals and agents which transport animals in or through this state, except that such businesses, individuals and agents licensed by the USDA shall be subject to USDA standards relating to transportation of animals.

CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B. No.636, § 4, subsec.1.) 273.352. Advisory committee, appointment, qualifications-duties to assist in establishing rules-not to receive compensation or expenses- rulemaking procedure 1. There is hereby established an advisory committee to assist the director in establishing rules under sections 273.350 and 273.352 and to provide ongoing review of the administration of sections 273.325 to 273.357.

  1. The members of the advisory committee shall receive no compensation or reimbursement for their expenses incurred in the performance of their duties.
  2. The advisory committee shall consist of thirteen persons appointed by the director as follows: (1) One person who operates or supervises an animal shelter; (2) One person who operates or is employed by a pound or dog pound; (3) One person who operates a commercial kennel or a boarding kennel; (4) One person who operates a pet shop and who sells both dogs and cats; (5) One dealer; (6) One person who operates or is employed by an animal humane society or other humane organization; (7) One veterinarian licensed pursuant to chapter 340, RSMo; (8) One person who is a commercial animal breeder, who breeds both dogs and cats; (9) One person representing the Missouri Animal Control Association; (10) One person representing professional cat breeders; (11) The state veterinarian of the department of agriculture; (12) The state public health veterinarian of the department of health and senior services; (13) One hobby or show breeder.2.

No rule or portion of a rule promulgated under the authority of this chapter shall become effective unless it has been promulgated pursuant to the provisions of section 536.024, RSMo. CREDIT(S) (L.1992, S.B. No.636, § 4, subsecs.2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Amended by L.1993, S.B.

  • No.52, § A; L.1995, S.B.
  • No.3, § A.) 273.354.
  • Laws not applicable to hospitals or boarding facility under supervision of veterinarians or research 1.
  • Sections 273.325 to 273.357 shall not apply to a place or establishment which operates under the immediate supervision and control of a duly licensed veterinarian as a facility where animals are hospitalized or boarded.2.

Nothing in sections 273.325 to 273.357 shall be construed as requiring licensing of research facilities or authorizing promulgation of rules affecting the design, outlines, guidelines, or performance of actual research or experimentation by a research facility as determined by that research facility’s institution animal care and use committee.

  • CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B.
  • No.636, § 5.) 273.357.
  • Animal care reserve fund created-all license fees to be deposited in fund-purpose and uses-lapse to general revenue, prohibited All fees collected by the director from licenses issued under sections 273.325 to 273.357 shall be used to administer the provisions of sections 273.325 to 273.357, and shall be deposited in the state treasury to the credit of the “Animal Care Reserve Fund”, which is hereby created.

All moneys deposited in the animal care reserve fund shall be subject to appropriation for the use and benefit of the department of agriculture to administer the provisions of sections 273.325 to 273.357. Notwithstanding the provisions of section 33.080, RSMo, to the contrary, moneys in the animal care reserve fund shall not be transferred to the general revenue fund at the end of the biennium.

  • CREDIT(S) (L.1992 S.B.
  • No.636, § 6.) 273.359.
  • Stacked cages without impervious barrier prohibited, penalty Any person required to have a license under sections 273.325 to 273.357 who houses animals in stacked cages without an impervious barrier between the levels of such cages, except when cleaning such cages, is guilty of a class A misdemeanor.

CREDIT(S) (L.2011, S.B. Nos.161, § 1, eff. April 27, 2011; L.2011, S.B. Nos.113 & 95, § 1.)

What is the dog law in Missouri?

October 20, 2021 | Dog Bites Missouri Who Regulates Dog Kennels Unlike some states in the U.S., Missouri doesn’t have a statewide leash law. However, there is an “adequate control” law that requires dogs and other animals to be restrained and supervised on public property to prevent harm to the animal, other animals, and people.

Who regulates animal shelters in the US?

Regulations established under the AWA set standards for the humane care and treatment for certain animals that are exhibited to the public, sold for use as pets, used in research, or transported commercially. Facilities using regulated animals for regulated purposes must provide their animals with adequate housing, sanitation, nutrition, water and veterinary care, and they must protect their animals from extreme weather and temperatures.

  1. The regulations also establish specific requirements that must be met prior to the importation of dogs for resale purposes.
  2. Highly-trained USDA inspectors located throughout the United States conduct routine, unannounced inspections of all facilities licensed or registered under the AWA to assess these facilities compliance with AWA.

Inspectors are classified as veterinary medical officers (VMOs) or Animal Care inspectors (ACIs). All VMOs have graduated from a veterinary medical college, and many have been private-practice veterinarians prior to joining USDA Animal Care. ACIs have education in the biological sciences and/or extensive experience in the care and handling of animals.

  • USDA Animal Care also employs veterinarians who specialize in the care of particular animal species as well as those with a specific area of animal expertise such as research or transportation.
  • Inspectors use the AWA standards and regulations as the baseline by which they assess a facility’s level of care provided to animals.

If a facility is meeting the federal standards, USDA knows the animals there are receiving humane care and treatment. Conversely, when inspectors identify items that are not in compliance with the federal standards, USDA Animal Care holds those facilities responsible for properly addressing and correcting those items within a set timeframe.

  1. If the noncompliance is not corrected, or if it is of a serious enough nature, USDA has the option to pursue appropriate regulatory compliance and enforcement actions.
  2. The AWA, which became law in 1966, does not cover every type of animal used in every type of activity.
  3. The following animals are not covered: farm animals used for food or fiber (fur, hide, etc.); coldblooded species (amphibians and reptiles); horses not used for research purposes; fish; invertebrates (crustaceans, insects, etc.); or birds, rats of the genus Rattus, and mice of the genus Mus that are bred for use in research.

Birds (other than those bred for research) are covered under the AWA but the regulatory standards have not yet been established.

How many dogs can you have before you need a kennel license in Missouri?

No more than four domestic animals may be kept on any one parcel of property within a residential-zoned district unless the property owner obtains a non-commercial kennel permit.

What do you need to get a dog license in Missouri?

About Dog Licenses – All dog owners who reside within the City limits are required to obtain a dog license. The dog must be six months of age and be vaccinated against rabies. The owner must bring proof of vaccination/spayed-neutered from their veterinarian.

Does Missouri have dog breed restrictions?

What Dogs Are Banned in Missouri? Figures from the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) show that at least 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs each year.

  • Moreover, severe dog attacks have been associated with more than 900 trips to hospital emergency rooms daily.
  • In response to the potentially high-risk dog bites posed to people’s safety, many states have imposed breed-specific ordinances, including Missouri.
  • While the state does not have a general law that prohibits, many cities have enacted ordinances that ban residents from keeping and breeding certain breeds.

Do you need a license to board dogs in Ohio?

According to the O.R.C. ( O.R.C.955.02 ), a kennel owner is defined as a person, firm, company, or corporation professionally engaged in the business of breeding dogs for sale. Greene County abides by the following guidelines:

Ohio law requires that all kennels be licensed each year no later than January 31st ( O.R.C.955.05 ) The penalty for purchasing a license after January 31st is equal to the license fee New kennel owners have thirty days to acquire a kennel license; after thirty days, a penalty is applied to the licensing fee The license fees are determined annually by the County Commissioners Kennel license may be purchased at the auditor’s office only

What state has the strictest dog laws?

Contact: [email protected] SAN FRANCISCO, CA — The Animal Legal Defense Fund, the nation’s preeminent legal advocacy organization for animals, has released the 16th annual year-end U.S. State Animal Protection Laws Rankings Report (2021), rankings the animal protection laws of all 50 states. Missouri Who Regulates Dog Kennels The most improved jurisdictions in 2021 were Hawaii (27) and Guam (ranked first out of the six U.S. territories). Both enacted comprehensive animal protection legislation in 2021. Hawaii was previously ranked 39th but rose 12 ranks by criminalizing sexual assault of animals and requiring veterinarians to report suspected animal cruelty. Guam was previously ranked fourth out of the six inhabited U.S. territories, but in 2021 enacted a comprehensive overhaul of its animal protection laws — relying heavily on the Animal Legal Defense Fund’s Model Animal Protection Laws — enabling Guam to snag the first-place rank among U.S. territories. A new national trend in 2021 was the enactment and strengthening of veterinary reporting laws and cross-reporting laws. Such laws either require or explicitly permit veterinarians or social service professionals to report suspected animal cruelty. In 2021 four states and one territory enacted veterinary reporting or cross-reporting laws. Another new national trend was the enactment of laws addressing certification and training of humane officers. Only 16 states have laws specifying both training standards and enforcement powers for humane officers — laws that are necessary to ensure proper enforcement of animal protection laws. Thankfully that number is trending upward, with three states — Maryland, Ohio, and Vermont — enacting comprehensive humane officer laws in 2021. “It is vital that we continue to strengthen our animal protection laws as animals are some of the most vulnerable members of society and are too often subjected to cruel mistreatment,” says Animal Legal Defense Fund Executive Director Stephen Wells. “The Animal Legal Defense Fund’s annual Rankings Report helps legislators and advocates identify weak points in their states’ laws — and highlight strong models that can be used to address those weaknesses.” The rankings are based on a comprehensive review of each "Jurisdiction" means that a court has the authority to hear a given case. When a court does not have that authority, a case may be dismissed for "lack of jurisdiction." ” data-mobile-support=”0″ data-gt-translate-attributes=””>jurisdiction ‘s animal protection laws, including over 3,000 pages of statutes. This is the longest-running and most authoritative report of its kind and tracks which states are taking animal protection seriously. The full report, including details about each state, is available at www.aldf.org/staterankings,

What is the statute 578.024 in Missouri?

578.024. Keeping a dangerous dog — penalties. — 1. A person commits the offense of keeping a dangerous dog if he or she owns or possesses a dog that has previously bitten a person or a domestic animal without provocation and that dog bites any person on a subsequent occasion.

2. The offense of keeping a dangerous dog is a class B misdemeanor, unless such attack:   (1) Results in serious injury to any person, in which case, it is a class A misdemeanor; or   (2) Results in serious injury to any person and any previous attack also resulted in serious injury to any person, in which case, it is a class E felony; or   (3) Results in the death of any person, in which case, it is a class D felony.

3. In addition to the penalty included in subsection 2 of this section, if any dog that has previously bitten a person or a domestic animal without provocation bites any person on a subsequent occasion or if a dog that has not previously bitten a person attacks and causes serious injury to or the death of any human, the dog shall be seized immediately by an animal control authority or by the county sheriff.

  • The dog shall be impounded and held for ten business days after the owner or possessor is given written notification and thereafter destroyed. 4.
  • The owner or possessor of the dog that has been impounded may file a written appeal to the circuit court to contest the impoundment and destruction of such dog.

The owner or possessor shall provide notice of the filing of the appeal to the animal control authority or county sheriff who seized the dog. If the owner or possessor files such an appeal and provides proper notice, the dog shall remain impounded and shall not be destroyed while such appeal is pending and until the court issues an order for the destruction of the dog.

  1. The court shall hold a disposition hearing within thirty days of the filing of the appeal to determine whether such dog shall be humanely destroyed.
  2. The court may order the owner or possessor of the dog to pay the costs associated with the animal’s keeping and care during the pending appeal. 5.
  3. Notwithstanding any provision of sections 273.033 and 273.036, section 578.022 and this section to the contrary, if a dog attacks or bites a person who is engaged in or attempting to engage in a criminal activity at the time of the attack, the owner or possessor is not guilty of any crime specified under this section or section 273.036, and is not civilly liable under this section or section 273.036, nor shall such dog be destroyed as provided in subsection 3 of this section, nor shall such person engaged in or attempting to engage in a criminal activity at the time of the attack be entitled to the defenses set forth in section 273.033,

For purposes of this section “criminal activity” shall not include the act of trespass upon private property under section 569.150 as long as the trespasser does not otherwise engage in, attempt to engage in, or have intent to engage in other criminal activity nor shall it include any trespass upon private property by a person under the age of twelve under section 569.140,

Are pets personal property in Missouri?

Understand the Legal Classification – Though your pets may seem like your children, they’re considered personal property under Missouri law. This means the pets must belong to either you or your spouse at the conclusion of your divorce. If you and your spouse cannot agree on who should get custody of an animal, the court will appoint one of you as the guardian.

Is Missouri a puppy mill state?

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — For the 11th year in a row, Missouri is number one on the Humane Society’s Horrible Hundred list of abusive or neglectful puppy breeders. More than 30 puppy mills in the state made it on the list. That’s more than double the number from any other state.

Michelle Cole, the director of operations at KC Paws, takes in neglected animals and tries to help them heal. “A lot of times they’ve never even felt grass on their feet before and that scares them,” she said. “It breaks our hearts because obviously we just want to hold them and cuddle and love on them and it’s scary to them.

They don’t know what it is to receive affection, they don’t understand.” Dogs from neglectful puppy mills tend to be in bad shape, according to Cody Atkinson, state director of Missouri’s Humane Society. Atkinson says the 31 Missouri puppy mills on the list put profit over health.

“It’s infuriating to put it simply,” he said. “To see folks be on that list for up to a decade sometimes. And see that these animals continue to be kept in these horrendous conditions.” So what can be done to stop the abuse? Katie Barnett, an animal law attorney, helped answer that question. “You have a lot of laws on the books, what’s problematic is how they’re enforced,” Barnett said.

“It’s not necessarily that there are these heartless enforcement agents out there, you know just ignoring this blanket animal cruelty that’s going on. They’re under funded, overworked.” Barnett and Atkinson agreed it comes down to how easy it is to be a breeder in Missouri, how light punishments are and how thin law enforcement is stretched in checking on the animals.

There also is confusion between agencies on whether or not enforcement of different violations are with the state or local agency’s jurisdiction. “It’s just a confusion of law, I mean it gets complicated,” he said. “And so it just takes a lot of education to those different enforcement agencies. While we’re fighting about the language of the law, the best thing to do is get whatever we have on the books enforced.” The only true way to cut supply provided by the mills is to cut their demand by not buying from problem mills and doing plenty of research into who is selling you an animal, Atkinson said.

Copyright 2023 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

What does Iacuc stand for?

The IUP Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is charged with ensuring compliance with federal regulations concerning the use and welfare of animals in teaching and research. The IACUC also strives to ensure that all uses of animals under the auspices of IUP are held to highest ethical standard.

The IUP IACUC operates from the Dean’s Office of the Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The IACUC exists to serve the entire IUP community by providing oversight of animal uses in teaching and research. The IACUC meets on a regular basis to review animal use protocols submitted by members of the IUP community, to ensure that the uses proposed are both humane and necessary.

IUP personnel wishing to utilize vertebrate animals in their teaching, research, or other endeavors must first receive approval from the IACUC. Approval is normally offered for a 12-month period; project renewal can be requested following initial approval.

All IACUC protocol forms (for protocol approval, renewal, or modification) are to be submitted in hardcopy form to the IUP Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Office of the Dean, Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 305 Weyandt Hall Questions regarding IUP’s IACUC or its functions should be e-mailed to [email protected],

Memos The IUP Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee occasionally issues “Memos to Investigators” as a means of keeping our IACUC-approved investigators up-to-date on IACUC developments and related news. IACUC External Resources Links to external animal care and use policies from federal agencies and professional societies Model IACUC protocols Model IACUC protocols provided by experienced investigators, as examples to those unfamiliar with IACUC protocol forms Forms Links to the most-commonly used IACUC forms IUP IACUC FAQs Answers to frequently asked questions related to investigator responsibilities in obtaining Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval for animal uses at IUP

How many dogs can be in one kennel?

Should dogs share one kennel? – As a general rule of thumb, it’s advisable to play it safe and only place one dog in each kennel. The reason for this is that even dogs with a mellow personality can suddenly show signs of aggression toward another dog sharing its kennel.

Can my dog stay in kennels?

Leaving your dog at boarding kennels – Kennels are an option for your dog when you’re away, but this will depend on whether your dog is comfortable with being in a kennel environment. Many dogs find kennels isolating and if your dog hates being left alone, leaving them in a home environment where they can enjoy the company of people will be best for them.

Can you leave a dog outside all night?

Weather Conditions and an Outdoor Dog – It’s important to protect your dog from the elements, such as wind, rain, snow, and even sunshine. Different types of weather bring different considerations on how to keep your dog safe. The length of time you can leave your dog outside greatly relies on the weather.

In extreme cold or hot conditions, your dog should be able to seek refuge in your home to balance out the outside temperature. There is nothing wrong with letting an active dog play in the snow for a while if he is able to come in and warm up. Similarly, a dog who enjoys sunbathing should have plenty of access to shade and cold water.

Without access to your home, dogs can overheat or even freeze to death. If your dog must be kept outside for a long period of time, invest in a kennel to give him shelter from weather conditions. Opt for one that is insulated, waterproof, and can be covered to block the sun’s rays.

  1. The kennel doesn’t need to be too large, just big enough for your dog to move around comfortably.
  2. Eep it stocked with warm blankets in the winter and cool towels in the summer.
  3. Never leave your dog unattended for long periods of time, this includes overnight.
  4. If something happens to your dog such as heatstroke or hypothermia, the longer it goes unattended the worse it will be for him.

Always check on him to make sure he has enough water and is not exhibiting any signs of health issues.

What is the law on animal abuse in Missouri?

578.012. Animal abuse — penalties. — 1. A person commits the offense of animal abuse if he or she:   (1) Intentionally or purposely kills an animal in any manner not allowed by or expressly exempted from the provisions of sections 578.005 to 578.023 and 273.030 ;   (2) Purposely or intentionally causes injury or suffering to an animal; or   (3) Having ownership or custody of an animal knowingly fails to provide adequate care which results in substantial harm to the animal.

What is the pet limit in Missouri?

Each household may own four domestic animals (dogs, cats, Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs and ferrets) in any combination, with some exceptions.

Does Missouri require a pet health certificate?

PURPOSE: This amendment sets requirements for dogs or cats imported from a foreign country. (1) Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The term Certificate of Veterinary Inspection means a legible record made on an official form of the state of origin, issued by an accredited licensed veterinarian.

  1. The official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection shall state that the animal(s) are free of visible signs of contagious, infectious, or communicable disease and describe the animal(s) by species, breed, sex, and age.
  2. All animals will be individually identified as defined by Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street N W, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov, or any other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian and listed as well as all data for required tests and vaccinations, including date, results, and the name of the laboratory on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions. (2) Entry Permits. Entry permit numbers may be obtained by contacting the Missouri Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health, (573) 751-4359. It is specifically noted within these rules when an entry permit is required.

Permits and information regarding Missouri’s import requirements may be obtained at this telephone number from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Central Time (CT)), Monday through Friday. (3) Relation to Federal Requirements. All animals entering Missouri must be in compliance with the Missouri requirements contained in this rule, in addition to federal regulations.

(4) Cattle (beef and dairy), Bison, and Exotic Bovids. All cattle, bison, or exotic bovids exchanged, bartered, gifted, leased, or sold entering Missouri must meet the following requirements: (A) Baby Calves-calves under two (2) months of age not accompanied by their dam may be imported by resident buyers, directly to a Missouri farm, or move directly from farm of origin to a market and must meet the following requirements: 1.

Entry permit must be obtained on all shipments of calves under two (2) months of age. All calves under two (2) months of age will be quarantined to the receiving farm for sixty (60) days; and 2. All calves under two (2) months of age must be individually identified by an official eartag as defined by Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street N W, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov, or registration tattoo or any other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian and listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions; (B) Brucellosis Requirements-All States- 1. A negative brucellosis test shall consist of one (1) of the following tests: Brucella Buffered Antigen (BBA) Card Test, Buffered Acidified Plate Antigen Presumptive Test, or other official tests approved by the state veterinarian.

  1. All tests, regardless of method, must be confirmed at a state- or federally-approved laboratory.
  2. Any discrepancies in test results must be reported to the state veterinarian’s office; 2.
  3. Test-eligible animals include all sexually intact animals eighteen (18) months of age and over; 3.
  4. All test-eligible animals must be individually identified by an official eartag as defined by Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street NW, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov, registration tattoo, or any other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian and listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions; 4. The state veterinarian may designate high incidence areas within certain states that must meet additional import restrictions and retest requirements; and 5. Classification of states.

  • Animals that originate directly from officially classified states must meet the requirements that follow: A.
  • Class free states- (I) Farm-of-origin animals may move to approved livestock markets and slaughter establishments accompanied by a waybill, bill of lading, or owner/shipper statement showing origin and destination; (II) Other animal movements must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, showing individual identification on all animals that are test-eligible; and (III) No brucellosis test or entry permit is required; B.

Class A states- (I) All animals must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection showing individual identification on all animals that are test-eligible. A negative brucellosis test within thirty (30) days prior to shipment is required on all test-eligible animals.

Farm-of-origin animals may move to an approved market or slaughter establishment accompanied by a waybill, bill of lading, or owner/shipper statement showing origin and destination; (II) Animals from certified brucellosis-free herds may enter on herd status without additional testing, provided the certified herd number and current test date is shown on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; (III) Rodeo bulls must have a negative brucellosis test within twelve (12) months prior to entering the state; and (IV) No entry permit is required; (C) Tuberculosis.1.

All test-eligible animals (those animals over two (2) months of age) must be officially individually identified and listed on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.2. Beef cattle.A. All classes of beef cattle (including exotic bovids and bison) two (2) months of age and older, both breeding and feeding, entering Missouri from a state having a tuberculosis-free status may enter without additional testing requirements or entry permit.B.

All classes of beef cattle (including exotic bovids and bison) two (2) months of age and older, both breeding and feeding, entering Missouri from a state having a tuberculosis status less than free must meet the following requirements: (I) Must obtain an entry permit; (II) Must have a negative tuberculosis test within sixty (60) days of shipment, test date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; or (III) Move from an accredited tuberculosis-free herd (herd number and current herd test date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection); or (IV) Move directly from a herd of origin that has had one (1) complete negative herd test within one (1) year (date of test must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection).3.

Dairy cattle.A. All classes of dairy cattle two (2) months of age and older, both breeding and feeding, entering Missouri must meet the following requirements: (I) Must obtain an entry permit; (II) Must have a negative tuberculosis test within sixty (60) days of shipment, test date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; or (III) Move from an accredited tuberculosis-free herd (herd number and current herd test date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection); or (IV) Move directly from a herd of origin that has had one (1) complete negative herd test within one (1) year (date of test must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection).4.

  • Importation of steers and spayed heifers from Mexico.A.
  • Steers and spayed heifers from Mexican states that have been determined by the state veterinarian of Missouri, based on the recommendation of the Bi-National Committee, to have fully implemented the Control/Preparatory Phase of the Mexican Tuberculosis Eradication Program may enter Missouri provided they have been tested negative for tuberculosis in accordance with the Norma Official Mexicana (NOM) within sixty (60) days prior to entry into the United States and obtain an entry permit prior to entering Missouri.B.

Steers and spayed heifers from Mexican states that have been determined by the state veterinarian of Missouri, based on the recommendation of the Bi-National Committee to have fully implemented the Eradication Phase of the Mexican Tuberculosis Eradication Program, may enter Missouri provided they have been tested negative for tuberculosis in accordance with the Norma Official Mexicana (NOM) within sixty (60) days prior to entry into the United States.

Steers and spayed heifers from these same Mexican states that originate from herds equal to U.S. Accredited TB-Free herds may enter Missouri without testing provided they are moved directly from the herd of origin across the border as a single group and not commingled with other cattle prior to arriving at the border and obtain an entry permit prior to entering Missouri.C.

Steers and spayed heifers from Mexican states that have been determined by the state veterinarian of Missouri, based on the recommendation of the Bi-National Committee, to have achieved accredited-free status may enter Missouri without testing provided they are moved as a single group and not commingled with cattle of a different status prior to arriving to the border and obtain an entry permit prior to entering Missouri.D.

Holstein and Holstein-cross steers and spayed heifers from Mexico are prohibited from entering Missouri regardless of test history.5. All rodeo stock, over eighteen (18) months of age, must be tested negative for tuberculosis within sixty (60) days and obtain an entry permit prior to entering Missouri.

No sexually intact rodeo stock from Mexico will be permitted into Missouri without a current tuberculosis test.6. The state veterinarian may designate high incidence areas within certain states that must meet additional import restrictions and retest requirements; and (D) Trichomonias is Requirements.1.

  • All breeding bulls (excluding bison and exotic bovids) entering the state shall be- A.
  • Virgin bulls not more than twenty-four (24) months of age as determined by the presence of both permanent central incisor teeth in wear or by breed registry papers; or B.
  • Be tested negative for Trichomoniasis with an official culture test or official Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test by an official laboratory within thirty (30) days prior to entry into the state.

(I) Bulls shall be tested three (3) times not less than one (1) week apart by an official culture test or one (1) time by official PCR test prior to entering Missouri. (II) Bulls shall be identified by official identification at the time the initial test sample is collected.

  1. III) Bulls that have had contact with female cattle subsequent to testing must be retested prior to entry.2.
  2. If the breeding bulls are virgin bulls, less than twenty-four (24) months of age, they shall be- A.
  3. Individually identified by official identification; B.
  4. Be accompanied with a breeder’s certification of virgin status signed by the breeder or his representative attesting that they are virgin bulls; and C.

The official identification number shall be written on the breeder’s certificate.3. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection listing official identification and test performed, date of test, results, and laboratory, if testing is required.4. Bulls going directly to slaughter are exempt from Trichomoniasis testing.

  • 5) Swine.
  • A) Swine are classified as the following: 1.
  • Commercial swine-swine that are continuously managed and have adequate facilities and practices to prevent exposures to feral swine; 2.
  • Feral swine-any swine that are free roaming or Russian and Eurasian that are confined.
  • This also includes javelinas and peccaries; and 3.

Transitional swine-swine raised on dirt or that have reasonable opportunities to be exposed to feral swine. (B) An entry permit and a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is required on all classes of swine entering Missouri, except farm-of-origin swine consigned directly to an approved market or slaughter establishment.

(C) All commercial or transitional swine, individual and/or moving in a production system, entering Missouri, except farm-of-origin swine consigned to an approved market or slaughter establishment, must meet the following requirements: 1. Must be veterinarian inspected, individually identified by an official eartag or group/lot identification number (GIN) as defined in Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street NW, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov, ear notch, tattoo, or any other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian and listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions; 2. Originate from a validated swine brucellosis-free state or from a validated brucellosis-free herd (herd numbers and current herd test dates must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection); and 3.

  1. Originate from a pseudorabies stage V state or from a qualified negative pseudorabies herd (herd numbers and current herd test dates must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection).
  2. D) All feral swine (including Eurasian and Russian swine) entering Missouri must- 1.
  3. Obtain an entry permit; 2.

Be officially identified; 3. Be listed individually on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, in addition to age, gender, and permit number of feral swine facility of destination; 4. Must be from a validated and qualified herd; last test date and herd numbers must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; or 5.

  1. Have two (2) negative tests sixty (60) days apart for brucellosis and pseudorabies within thirty to sixty (30-60) days prior to movement.
  2. The laboratory and test date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.6.
  3. Feral swine moving directly from the farm-of-origin to an approved processing facility or to an approved slaughter-only facility will be exempt from any required testing.

(E) Transitional swine may move to a licensed livestock market/sale or to slaughter.1. Feeder pigs from transitional swine herds may move from farm-of-origin to a market to be inspected and individually officially identified and then moved from the market under quarantine to be finished for slaughter.2.

All other transitional swine must move from market directly to slaughter. (6) Equidae. This includes exotic equine, donkeys, asses, burros, and zebras. (A) All equidae (except nursing foals accompanied by their dams) bartered, donated, exchanged, gifted, leased, relinquished, sold, or otherwise involved in a change of ownership entering Missouri must be accompanied by- 1.

A negative Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) test within twelve (12) months prior to entry and documented on a VS Form 10-11 or any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart showing the graphic description of all markings or imprinted photograph on any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart needed for permanent identification.A.

For change of ownership (including leasing or gifting) an original VS Form 10-11 or any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart is required.B. No equidae will be sold EIA test pending through private treaty; and 2. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is required showing identification (registered legible tattoo, registered brand, microchip, or any other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian) and description of each equidae listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; or photograph of each equidae imprinted on the VS Form 10-11 or any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart and listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

(B) For purpose of travel or exhibition, a certified photocopy or certified facsimile of the VS Form 10-11 or any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart may be accepted.1. A certified photocopy is one (1) obtained from the testing veterinarian or accredited testing laboratory bearing seal or signature in the lower right-hand corner along with the date of certification in some ink color other than black.2.

  1. A certified facsimile may be obtained only from the testing veterinarian or accredited testing laboratory and must bear the facsimile imprint of the originating facility clearly across the top of the page.
  2. It must also bear the date of the facsimile either along the top or in the lower right-hand corner.

(C) For purpose of travel or exhibition, Missouri will accept six (6)-month passports from states with which there is a reciprocal agreement. These passports must meet the following criteria: 1. Proof of a negative EIA test within thirty (30) days of the date of application of the passport; 2.

Permanent identification for each horse by means of registered brand, legible tattoo, imprinted photograph on any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart, or electronic identification (microchip); to be recorded on the passport and the VS Form 10-11 or any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart with other identifying characteristics; 3.

Inspection by an accredited veterinarian; and 4. In the event of confirmed vesicular stomatitis in any of the states with which reciprocal agreements exist, use of the six (6)-month passport will be suspended by the state veterinarian of Missouri. (D) Equidae entering Missouri moving directly from a farm-of-origin (defined as maintained on premises for at least one hundred twenty (120) days) to a licensed Missouri livestock market/sale may be accompanied by a waybill or owner/shipper statement showing origin and destination, in lieu of a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

(E) Alteration or substitution of any information on the VS Form 10-11 or any officially recognized federal/state EIA test chart, including certified photocopy and certified facsimile, or Certificate of Veterinary Inspection shall cause the document to be invalid and in violation of sections 267.010 to 267.730, RSMo, and may result in civil penalties not to exceed ten thousand dollars ($10,000) per violation.

(F) Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis (VEE) vaccination is required three (3) weeks prior to entry on equidae originating from states in which VEE has been diagnosed within the preceding twelve (12) months. An entry permit is also required on equine from those states.

  1. G) Equidae positive for brucellosis may not enter Missouri.
  2. 7) Sheep (including exotic sheep and antelope).
  3. A) All sheep, including exotic sheep and antelope, regardless of age or gender, bartered, exchanged, gifted, leased, or sold entering Missouri must be free of symptoms of infectious or contagious diseases.

(B) All sheep (including exotic sheep and antelope), regardless of age or gender, must be individually identified by official scrapie identification as defined in Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 79, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street N W, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov or any other means of identification approved by the state veterinarian identifying them to the flock-of-origin and listed on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

  • This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions.
  • C) Flock-of-origin sheep (including exotic sheep and antelope) consigned directly to a licensed Missouri market/sale or a slaughter establishment must have individual official scrapie identification identifying them to the flock-of-origin but will not be required to have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

(D) Scrapie-positive, suspects, or high-risk animals may enter Missouri for immediate slaughter only and with specific approval from the state veterinarian. (E) Sheep (including exotic sheep and antelope) from a scabies-quarantined area must be dipped or treated by an officially approved method within ten (10) days prior to entering Missouri.

  1. F) No tests or permit is required on sheep (including exotic sheep and antelope) entering Missouri.
  2. 8) Goats (including exotic goats).
  3. A) All goats (including exotic goats), regardless of age or gender, bartered, exchanged, gifted, leased, or sold entering Missouri must be free of symptoms of infectious or contagious diseases.

(B) All goats (including exotic goats), regardless of age or gender, must be individually identified by official scrapie identification as defined in Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 79, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street NW, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov or any other means of identification approved by the state veterinarian identifying them to the herd-of-origin and listed on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions. (C) Herd-of-origin goats (including exotic goats) consigned directly to a licensed Missouri market/sale or slaughter establishment must be individually identified by official scrapie identification identifying them to the herd-of-origin but will not be required to have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

(D) Scrapie-positive, suspects, or high-risk animals may enter Missouri for immediate slaughter only and with specific approval from the state veterinarian. (E) No tests or permit is required on goats (including exotic goats) entering Missouri. (9) Poultry and Waterfowl.

(A) Live poultry (except those consigned directly to slaughter) shall be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection or a VS Form 9-3 (see 2 CSR 30-2.040 ). If a VS Form 9-3 is used, a signed and dated owner/shipper statement must be included stating that, to his/her best knowledge, the birds are healthy.

Poultry known to be infected with pullorum or typhoid that are consigned directly to slaughter must be identified as such by the consignor. (B) Live poultry entering Missouri must be tested negative for pullorum-typhoid within the past ninety (90) days or originate from a flock approved by the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) or an equivalent program which has been tested within the past twelve (12) months with no change of ownership.

C) Hatching eggs must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection certifying the eggs to be from pullorum-free flocks or by a VS Form 9-3. (D) All poultry and hatching eggs imported into Missouri require an entry permit prior to shipment. Annual entry permits shall be issued by the department to participants in the NPIP or an equivalent program.

Producers not approved by NPIP or an equivalent program must request a permit with each shipment. (10) Captive Cervids. (A) Captive cervids including but not limited to elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, roe deer, white-tail deer, mule deer, sika deer, moose, reindeer, mutjac, and fallow deer that are bartered, exchanged, gifted, leased, or sold entering Missouri, regardless of age, must be veterinary inspected, individually identified by official eartag as defined in Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street NW, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov, or other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian and listed on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions. (B) An entry permit is required. (C) Brucellosis Requirement.1. All sexually intact animals six (6) months of age and over not in a status herd or under quarantine for brucellosis must test negative for brucellosis within ninety (90) days prior to movement except- A.

Brucellosis-free herd-captive cervids originating from certified brucellosis-free herds may enter on herd status without additional testing provided the certified herd number and current test date is listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection; and B.

Brucellosis-monitored herd-all sexually intact animals six (6) months of age and older must test negative for brucellosis within ninety (90) days prior to interstate movement. (D) Tuberculosis Requirements.1. Captive cervids, less than six (6) months of age, not known to be affected or exposed to tuberculosis and not in a status herd must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, within ninety (90) days prior to entering Missouri, using the single cervical method.

The negative test date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Captive cervids must have been isolated from other captive cervids during the testing period.2. Captive cervids, six (6) months of age and older, not known to be affected with or exposed to tuberculosis and not in a status herd, must have two (2) negative tuberculosis tests, not less than ninety (90) days apart, using the single cervical method.

The second test must be within ninety (90) days prior to movement. Both negative tests dates must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Captive cervids must have been isolated from other captive cervids during the testing period.3. Movement from tuberculosis status herds.A. Accredited herd-captive cervids originating from an accredited tuberculosis-free cervid herd may enter on herd status without additional testing provided the accredited herd number and current test date is listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.B.

Qualified herd-captive cervids originating from a qualified herd must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, using the single cervical method, within ninety (90) days prior to the date of movement.C. Monitored herd-captive cervids originating from a monitored herd must have one (1) negative tuberculosis test, using the single cervical method, within ninety (90) days prior to the date of movement.D.

Captive cervids less than twelve (12) months of age that originate from and were born in a status herd may be moved without further testing provided that they have not been exposed to captive cervids from a lower status herd. (E) Chronic Wasting Disease.1. Captive cervids will not be allowed to enter the state if, within the last five (5) years, the animal- A.

Originates from an area or has been in an area that has been reported as a Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) endemic area; and B. Originates from a CWD positive captive herd.2. Elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, roe deer, white-tailed deer, mule deer, sika deer, and moose entering Missouri from any state must have participated in a CWD certification program for five (5) consecutive years.

  • Other cervids, including but not limited to reindeer, mutjac, and fallow deer, must have participated in a certification program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri.
  • Original anniversary date must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.3.
  • Captive cervids moving between publicly-owned American Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited zoos must meet the CWD certification program requirements.

(11) Alpacas, Camels, and Llamas. (A) All alpacas, camels, and llamas bartered, exchanged, leased, sold, or relinquished entering Missouri (excluding livestock markets) must be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection showing an individual listing of the common name(s) of the animal(s) such as sex, age, weight, and coloration and be individually identified by official eartag as defined in Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, published annually in January, herein incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street N W, Washington, DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800, DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov, microchip, tattoo, or any other means of permanent identification approved by the state veterinarian.

  • This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions.
  • B) No tests or permit is required to enter Missouri.
  • 12) Ratites (including but not limited to ostrich, rheas, and emus).
  • A) A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is required on all ratites bartered, exchanged, leased, sold, or relinquished entering Missouri, except farm-of-origin ratites consigned to an approved slaughter establishment.

Ratites must be veterinary inspected and individually identified by official identification (leg band, microchip, wing band, legible tattoo, or other means approved by the state veterinarian) and listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. Ear tags attached to the ratites are not acceptable.

(B) No tests or permit is required on ratites entering Missouri. (13) Psittacine birds, (including but not limited to macaws or parrots) except budgerigar, must have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection to enter Missouri. (14) Dogs and Cats. (A) All dogs and cats entering Missouri must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

Dogs and cats over four (4) months of age must be vaccinated for rabies by one (1) of the methods and within the time period published in the current Compendium of Animal Rabies Vaccines by the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc., incorporated by reference and made a part of this rule, as published by the United States Superintendent of Documents, 732 N Capital Street N W, Washington DC 20402-0001, phone: toll free (866) 512-1800: DC area (202) 512-1800, website: http://bookstore.gpo.gov,

This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions. (B) Any person who transports a domestic dog or cat from a foreign country into Missouri shall provide the recipient with a copy of that animal’s Certificate of Veterinary Inspection and when applicable, rabies vaccination information as prescribed in (14)(A) of this rule, not more than thirty (30) days after transfer of the dog or cat to the recipient.

(C) Any person who receives a domestic dog or cat from a foreign country into Missouri shall provide the state veterinarian with a copy of that animal’s Certificate of Veterinary Inspection and when applicable, rabies vaccination information as prescribed in (14)(A) of this rule, not more than thirty (30) days after acquisition of the dog or cat.

D) All dogs and cats must be eight (8) weeks of age to enter into commerce. (15) Aquaculture. All aquaculture entering Missouri must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection and obtain an entry permit. All Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) susceptible species must be tested in compliance with federal regulations; laboratory, test date, and results must be listed on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

(16) Miscellaneous and Exotic Animals. All exotic animals must be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection showing an individual listing of the common name(s) of the animal(s) and appropriate descriptions of animal(s) such as sex, age, weight, coloration, and the permanent identification.

(A) Elephants (Asiatic, African) must test negative for tuberculosis within one (1) year prior to entry. (B) Importation of skunks and raccoons into Missouri is prohibited by the Missouri Wildlife Code, 3 CSR 10-9. (C) No tests are required for animals moving between publicly-owned American Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited zoos but must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection.

Cervids moving between publicly-owned AZA-accredited zoos must meet the chronic wasting disease monitoring requirements as outlined in subsection (10) (E). An entry permit is required on all animals moving between publicly-owned American Zoos and Aquariums (AZA)-accredited zoos.

Are pets considered property in Missouri?

When you a person or a family who loves your pets, it is common for you to argue vigorously over who will get to keep the pets. As we know, pets can become so important that they like a member of our family! Unfortunately, as pets have developed an increasing importance in our family units, the law has not necessarily grown with the important role that many pets have today.

  1. Under Missouri and Kansas divorce laws, a pet is personal property.
  2. A family pet is sadly treated exactly the same as any other material item in the home.
  3. Obviously, if there have been situations or concerns of animal cruelty then this can be raised in a different way to the judge involved, however, many situations of disputes about where the family pet should go do not involve animal cruelty.

It is common when a couple divorces if there pet is a valued member of their family, that the couple will disagree about who the pet should be awarded to after a divorce and how the pet should be cared for. In an effort to decide which spouse will receive the ownership of personal property, including pets in a divorce process, the court will generally look to several factors in Kansas and Missouri divorces. Generally, when the court is trying to equitably divide assets, this includes personal property.

General principles of property division will apply to personal property, and therefore, pets. For example, if a pet was given to one party as a gift, that property, including a family pet can be set aside to the party gifted the item (the pet). After looking at all of the relevant property division factors, if the parties cannot come to an agreement, the court will ultimately have to make a decision about which property belongs to which party (again, with a family pet being considered personal property).

In some circumstances, using judicial discretion, some courts have started to try to engage in a more in-depth analysis in trying to figure out pet custody in a similar way as how the court would determine child custody. In the situations, the court will look at the overriding circumstance of the “best interests” of the dog or other pet at issue.

Generally, in a child custody situation, the court will look to a variety of factors including where the child prefers to live, who can best meet the child’s needs, the health and living patterns of each parent and other similar factors. Similarly, the court, in conducting a best interests analysis related to pets, may look at similar issues in trying to determine where a pet may prefer to live, who the pet is most bonded to, who has time in their schedule to care for the pet (as opposed to a spouse that travels frequently for work and other similar considerations), who has traditionally cared for the pets and even spent time with the pets.

The court also has the ability to consider other unique or special considerations such as if there will be other dogs in the home that do not get along well with the animal at issue, if there is a lack of safe, fenced yard area for the animal and the like.

It is important to note, however, that given pets’ status as personal property, the court is not required to consider the animal’s best interests in making an ultimate award of the family pet. In some situations, courts have determined that the best outcome for both, the pet, as well as each spouse is award some form of shared custody of the animal(s) to both spouses.

In other scenarios, the spouses agree to a shared custody arrangement of the pet, deciding that neither want to risk the unbearable possibility that the animal would be awarded to the other spouse and they would not see their beloved pet again in the future.